Tag Archives: NYT crossword

Dime Store

New York Times crossword puzzle June 22 / Constructed by Elizabeth C. Gorski

Brother, can you spare a dime? If not, you can find one in this puzzle.

More precisely, you can find TEN CENTS – literally 10 squares where the ¢ symbol appears. All the theme answers contain the word CENT, with the added twist that the C should be entered as a ¢ sign. That allows it to function as a C for across answers and an I for down answers:

Make cents? (Click to enlarge.)

Make cents? (Click to enlarge.)

_ ¢ENTENNIAL (“2014, for Doublemint gum,” 23 Across) crosses with TAIL (“Dangerous part of an alligator,” 1 Down). IRIDES-¢ENT (“Like mother-of-pearl,” 44 Across) crosses with ISLIP (“Town on the south shore of Long Island,” 45 Down).

_ VI¢ENTE FOX (“Mexican president of the early 2000s,” 25 Across) crosses with the first I in PAIN PILL (“Percocet, for one,” 12 Down). The second I crosses with the C in ¢ENTRIST (“Middle-of-the-road,” 40 Across).

_ ¢ENTIPEDES (“Bugs that are technically misnamed,” 70 Across) crosses with WRITE-UPS (“Articles in a paper,” 58 Down). PER¢ENTAGE (“Agent’s cut,” 93 Across) crosses with TOMEI (“Actress who co-starred in ‘The Lincoln Lawyer’,” 71 Down).

_ I’M INNO¢ENT (“Defendant’s cry,” 116 Across) crosses with IAN (“Actor McKellen,” 117 Down). DE¢ENT MEAL (“Something square to eat?” 113 Across) crosses with AIDE (“Right hand,” 106 Down). And RE¢ENT PAST (“Several days ago, say,” 66 Across) crosses with IRON-ON (“Like some patches,” 68 Down).

What do all those ¢ add up to? TEN ¢ENTS (“Total value of the symbols created by the special crossings in this puzzle,” 96 Across). (That answer itself crosses with I SWEAR at 97 Down – “‘Honest!’”)

Pretty cool, huh? I generally love puzzles by constructor Elizabeth C. Gorski, and this creative one was no exception. Some of the fill was a bit cheesy, though. Since when is SMOOTHEN a word (“Sand, maybe,” 101 Across)? I usually just say “smooth.” And I’ve never heard of the THI – or seen it used in a crossword. It’s apparently short for Temperature-Humidity Index (“Summer weather stat.” 29 Down). And STU Jackson was barely an NBA coach (88 Down), though he was a league executive for a while.  (Phil Jackson, on the other hand … )

That said, I liked STATE DEPT (“Hillary Clinton’s domain, once: Abbr.” 80 Down), SPEED TRAP (“Where many tickets are distributed,” 2 Down) and THE NILE (“Agatha Christie mystery setting,” 5 Down).

Memory Lane Dept.: Puzzle editor Will Shortz ran a crossword with a similar monetary theme last year. Constructor Daniel A. Finan that incorporated both $ and ¢ symbols in a clever grid called “Show Me The Money.”

Fun Facts Dept.: TULANE is the “Southern university whose newspaper is the Hullabaloo” (65 Across). “Of Peter O’Toole’s eight Oscar nominations,” he’s won NONE (120 Across). And the “Youngest-ever French Open winner, 1990″ is Monica SELES (53 Down), who recently got engaged to billionaire Tom Golisano.

Need some solving tips and tricks? I’ve posted some here. Feel free to ask questions or leave comments below. You can also visit my Facebook page, or tweet me @crosswordkathy. And here’s a little more about me.

On Wheels

New York Times crossword puzzle April 20 / Constructed by Elizabeth C. Gorski

Be careful making your way through today’s clever puzzle: It’s filled with cars, and there’s no crosswalk in sight.

Constructor Elizabeth C. Gorski is known for great visual tricks, so I immediately focused on the answers containing circled letters. The first one I solved yielded an O in each circle: TO YOU (“Toast words after ‘Here’s’,” 26 Across). Hmmm. Kinda seems like she’s trying to symbolize the “wheels” in the title, no? But I was stuck, partly because I mistakenly wrote ALFY for “Woody’s ‘Annie Hall’ role” at 3 Down. (I later realized it’s ALVY.)

Today's puzzle is a veritable parking lot. (Click to enlarge.)

Today’s puzzle is a veritable parking lot. (Click to enlarge.)

So I moved on and quickly found two more O’s in the circles of BOLEROS (“Short open jackets,” 41 Across). The answer directly above that came easily: MUSTANG SALLY (“1966 Wilson Pickett R&B hit,” 34 Across). Well, whaddya know? The MUSTANG is perfectly balanced over the “wheels” in BOLEROS. Pretty neat.

Other vehicles: The Hyundai SONATA, in HORN SONATA (“Recital piece for a wind player,” 25 Across); the Cadillac SEVILLE, in BARBER OF SEVILLE (“Opera based on a play by Pierre Beaumarchais, with ‘The’,” 54 Across); the Dodge CHARGER, in SAN DIEGO CHARGER (“Qualcomm Stadium athlete,” 76 Across); the Volkswagen BEETLE, in BEETLE BAILEY (“Walker’s strip,” 93 Across); the Kia OPTIMA, in OPTIMA CARD (“Visa alternative,” 110 Across); the Subaru FORESTER, in C.S. FORESTER (“‘The African Queen’ novelist,” 112 Across); and the Honda CIVIC, from CIVIC PRIDE (“Attribute of Elks or Lions Club members,” 23 Across).

Mag Wheels / Wheels Mag Dept.: A place to read more about these cars is MOTOR Trend magazine (16 Down).

Philly Shout-Out Dept.: A “Mobile home seeker?” is CALDER, as in artist Alexander Calder. His mobile “Ghost” can be found in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and his father’s Swann Memorial Fountain is one of my favorite spots in the city. His grandfather, Alexander Milne Calder, created the massive sculpture of William Penn that’s perched atop City Hall. (No, it’s not Benjamin Franklin!)

Plumbing Dept.: It’s not worth explaining how I screwed up my initial entry for “Pipe valves” at 43 Across. Suffice to say that when I finally figured out what it was supposed to be, it was a term I had never heard: STOPCOCKS. I also wrongly entered DEACON at 93 Down (“English church official”) and had change it to the more esoteric BEADLE after filling in some surrounding answers.

Um, Who? Dept.: Crossing words gave me RANDI as the “‘Amazing’ debunker” at 75 Down, but I had to look it up to understand the answer. Apparently former magician James Randi and his foundation work to expose “supernatural” phenomena and the like.

Short Circuit Dept.: EES (“Some M.I.T. grads: Abbr.” 88 Down) are EES, which would really be written “EEs,” which is short for electrical engineers. Cheap.

Hoppy Holidays Dept.: Today is Easter, so I’ll point out the “Query from Judas” at 97 Down: IS IT I?

For Fun Dept.: Some fun words in the fill, including COLD CEREAL (“Quaker production,” 46 Down), SNOWY EGRET (“Bird whose feathers were once prized by milliners,” 43 Down), ANDRONICUS (“Shakespeare’s ‘Titus ___’,” 38 Down), SCOTT TUROW (“Best-selling novelist whom Time called ‘Bard of the Litigious Age’,” 21 Across) and COTTON BALL “Makeup removal item,” 114 Across).

Haha Dept.: “City that sounds like a humdinger?” is BUTTE (96 DOWN). Get it? It’s pronounced BYOOT, as in “beaut”? Me neither.

Whoops! Dept.: Reader Bob Lee gently corrected me on 25 Across, which of course should be HORN SONATA, not HORA as I wrote in my grid.  (See comments below.) Thanks!

Need some solving tips and tricks? I’ve posted some here. Feel free to ask questions or leave comments below. You can also visit my Facebook page, or tweet me @crosswordkathy. And here’s a little more about me.

Musical Interpretation

New York Times crossword puzzle March 30 / Constructed by Peter A. Collins

You don’t need to know much about music to interpret today’s puzzle. But it does help to be familiar with classic rock and have a creative sense of wordplay: The theme answers consist of literally rendered song titles.

The trickery became clear early on after crossing words left me with  _MOK_  at 37 Across. I knew from the clue (“With 43-Across, 1973 Deep Purple hit?”) that the song was “Smoke on the Water,” but there weren’t enough spaces. That meant the “on” had to be implied: SMOKE literally sits “on” THE WATER, which is entered directly below at 43 Across.

Song titles get literal interpretations in this grid. (Click to enlarge.)

Song titles get literal interpretations in this grid. (Click to enlarge.)

Others: STAND / YOUR MAN, for “Stand by Your Man” (With 89-Down, 1968 Tammy Wynette hit?”, 95 Down); TIME TIME, for “Time After Time” (“1984 Cyndi Lauper hit?” 78 Across); and R-O-C-K / THE CLOCK, for “Rock Around the Clock,” where ROCK are the circled letters surrounding THE CLOCK (“With the circled letters, 1955 Bill Haley and His Comets hit?” 28 Across). Speaking of which, the label for that song was DECCA (22 Down).

The trickiest ones: NOOMDAB at 90 Down, for “Bad Moon Rising” (“1969 Creedence Clearwater Revival hit?”) – the BAD MOON “rises” from bottom to top; and LOATEENAGERVE at 66 Across, for “A Teenager in Love” (“1959 Dion and the Belmonts hit?”). The words A TEENAGER are literally placed “in” the word LOVE.

So, what did you think? Not bad. But here’s the place where I reiterate my longstanding complaint about music references being too old – nearly 60 years for “Rock Around the Clock”! – and I repeat my (so far empty) vow to create a similar puzzle with modern tunes. Although perhaps a Miley Cyrus reference was implied by the presence of TWERK at 7 Down (“Back it up, in a way”)? Yikes!

For Fun Dept.: There was lots of good fill in this grid, including TOO CAREFUL (“What fastidious people can’t be,” 16 Down), IN BAD SHAPE (“Suffering,” 3 Down), DICK AND JANE (“Primer pair,” 116 Across), SUBSISTENCE (“Kind of farming,” 23 Across), SGT. BILKO (“NCO of 1950s TV,” 65 Down) and – holy cow! – EMPIRICIST (“John Locke, philosophically,” 70 Down).

Haha Dept.: There were some really punny jokes, too. “Where to find screwdrivers and rusty nails” are BARROOMS (109 Across); “Rubber from Arabia?” is ALADDIN (93 Down); “Slanted writing” are EDITORIALS (75 Down); and “Runners in the cold?” are NOSES (125 Across).

Ouch! Dept.: “Memorable series in ‘Psycho’” are STABS (79 Across).

Learn Something New Every Day Dept.: From crossing words, I figured out that “The ‘T’ of Mr. T” stands for TERO (43 Down). Various biographies indicate he was born Lawrence Tureaud, which I’m guessing is a hard-to-pronounce French surname that some family members (including him) changed to its phonetic pronunciation, TERO. I also didn’t know that TARS is another word for “deck hands” (“Hands on deck,” 61 Down).

Need some solving tips and tricks? I’ve posted some here. Feel free to ask questions or leave comments below. You can also visit my Facebook page, or tweet me @crosswordkathy. And here’s a little more about me.

Bright Ideas

New York Times crossword puzzle March 23 / Constructed by Ian Livengood

Love getting that “Aha!” moment when solving crosswords? You’ll get at least two of them today while working on this self-referential puzzle about THOMAS EDISON (86 Across).

You have to deduce the subject from crossing letters, or from the three-part witticism entered at 23-, 29- and 43 Across: I HAVE NOT FAILED, I’VE JUST FOUND TEN THOUSAND WAYS THAT WON’T WORK (” … motivational comment attributed to 86-Across”).

Circled letters in the grid symbolize an inventor's bright idea. (Click to enlarge.)

Circled letters in the grid symbolize an inventor’s bright idea. (Click to enlarge.)

Known as THE WIZARD OF MENLO PARK (96 Across) – the New Jersey town where he had a laboratory – Edison is known for inventing the INCANDESCENT LIGHT BULB (106 Across). Constructor Ian Livengood has cleverly hidden one in the grid, which you get by connecting the circled letters. An editor’s note indicates the letters, when read counterclockwise from the top, spell out “a phrase relating to the puzzle’s theme”: AHA MOMENT.

It’s a well done puzzle, although I’m wondering what the peg is … an anniversary of some type? Perhaps it’s a eulogy, considering that Edison’s signature achievement is being phased out of production in the U.S. – the bulbs no longer meet federal energy-efficiency standards.

Philly Shout-Out Dept.: “Dolph of ‘Rocky IV’” is LUNDGREN (116 Across). Our city’s favorite fictional son just debuted on Broadway last week. Philly tourism officials hope the musical “Rocky” will convince theater-goers to travel down I-95 (or hop Amtrak) to see the sights that inspired the story.

Sports Section Dept. “United Center team” are the CHICAGO BULLS (12 Down), while “Five-time Super Bowl champions, informally” are THE NINERS (47 Down). The 49ers don’t play in the NFC SOUTH, but New Orleans does (“Saint’s home, for short,” 19 Across).

For Fun Dept.: Unusual entries in the puzzle include DNA MOLECULE (“Bit of a code,” 3 Down), SESAME BAGELS (“Deli stock with seeds,” 60 Down) and OPEN CIRCUIT (“What an electric current does not flow through,” 67 Down).

Cruel Joke Dept.: As this unending winter continues into spring – with more snow possible on Tuesday – there is not a TAN LINE to be found around here (“Sunbathing evidence,” 90 Down).

Doubled-Up Dept.: “D.C. mover” at 101 Down is the METRO, while the “D.C. mover and shaker: Abbr.” at 119 Across is a SEN(ator).

Need some solving tips and tricks? I’ve posted some here. Feel free to ask questions or leave comments below. You can also visit my Facebook page, or tweet me @crosswordkathy. And here’s a little more about me.

It’s Better This Way

New York Times crossword puzzle March 16 / Constructed by Jeremy Newton

How do you get from SICK to WELL? By going to the doctor. Or by taking the sage advice of today’s puzzle: FOLLOWING THE PRESCRIPTION (“With 58-Down, a patient process? … or a hint to two consecutive letters in the answer to each of the seven starred clues,” 16 Down).

This clever crossword takes you through the healing process, starting with getting SICK in the upper left corner and then moving diagonally through a medicinal path to WELL in the lower right. SICK comes from the circled letters in SICK OF (“So over,” 1 Across), while WELL is from DO WELL (“Thrive, 119 Across).

This puzzle shows the path to wellness.

This puzzle shows the path to wellness. (Click to enlarge.)

The medicine, of course, is symbolized by the RX in each of the theme answers – RX being the abbreviation for “prescription.” The first is found in XERXES I OF PERSIA (“*He bested Leonidas at Thermopylae,” 23 Across), followed by FOUR-X-FOUR (“*Off-roader, often,” 31 Across).

Continuing to follow the prescription, you’ll find THE WINTER X GAMES (“*Annual draw for snocross fans,” 49 Across), GROUCHO MARX MUSTACHE (“*Iconic feature of comedy,” 65 Across), PROFESSOR XAVIER (“*Founder of Marvel’s School for Gifted Youngsters,” 79 Across), SOLVE FOR X (“*Frequent problem faced by algebra students,” 97 Across) and RETURN OF DOCTOR X (“*Horror flick starring Humphrey Bogart as a mad scientist, with ‘The’,” 108 Across). What a bizarre role for Bogey!

Silver Screen Dept.: Speaking of movies, “Clueless” and “Bridget Jones’s Diary” are ROM-COMS (40 Down). “Loud beast heard in theaters” is the MGM LION (57 Down), which nearly stumped me and was one of the last answers I filled in. And Xerxes is back in theaters now with “300: Rise of an Empire.” It’s the sequel to the stylized 2006 film “300,” which tells the story of Leonidas’ Spartans and their battle against the Persian king who considered himself a god.

Corner Drugstore Dept.: By the way, my first instinct when I get sick is to buy something OTC (“Like Advil or Aleve: Abbr.” 54 Across).

For Fun Dept.: Unusual entries in the grid include EAST-WEST (“How lines of latitude run,” 21 Down),  ADAM’S ALE (“Water, wryly,” 115 Across), RESCUE ME (“1965 R&B #1 song with the repeated lyric “Can’t you see that I’m lonely?’” 20 Across), THING IS (“‘That may be true, but …’” 55 Across) and HOT WAX (“Hair-razing stuff?” 56 Down)

New To Me Dept.: Apparently an L-BAR is a “Bent beam” (76 Across), which I got from crossing words. It’s also known as an angle iron.

Ugh Dept.: The other entry that took me forever to get was RSTU (“They’re 18 to 21,” 73 Down). The numbers refer to the letters’ places in the alphabet.

Shameless Promotion Dept.: Some of you may know that I am an aspiring constructor … and I’m thrilled to report my first puzzle was published this week in Games magazine! Still aiming to impress Will and get a grid printed in the NYT, of course, but one step at a time. Thanks to everyone for the supportive comments and “likes” on my Facebook page!

Philly Shout-Out Dept.: Today’s shout-out goes to my fellow Philadelphians as we brace for yet another snowfall tonight. Amid this never-ending winter, here’s a badly needed laugh featuring Groucho Marx and his mustache in “Duck Soup.”

Need some solving tips and tricks? I’ve posted some here. Feel free to ask questions or leave comments below. You can also visit my Facebook page, or tweet me @crosswordkathy. And here’s a little more about me.

Nosy Nonsense

New York Times crossword puzzle March 9 / Constructed by Brendan Emmett Quigley

Between my jet lag coming back to Philly and the jump ahead to Daylight Saving Time, I’m operating four hours behind schedule and my brain is somewhat addled. Luckily, today’s puzzle was easy-peasy.

The theme answers add a “zee” sound to common phrases, as evidenced in the title: “Nosy Nonsense.” So a “Marvel from Idaho’s largest city?” is a BOISE WONDER (103 Across), while a “Picky little dog?” is a CHOOSY TOY (28 Across), from chew toy.

Others: “Business transactions free from government regulation?” are EASY COMMERCE (52 Across), for e-commerce. A “Barely remembered seaman?” is a HAZY SAILOR (36 Down). The “Sports score most likely to be on the highlight reel?” is a DOOZY POINT (44 Down). A “Carefree dairy product?” is BREEZY CHEESE (73 Across). “Optimistic theater audience?” is a ROSY HOUSE (101 Across). And “One unsatisfied with a ‘She loves me, she loves me not’ result?” is a DAISY TRADER (26 Across).

City of Brotherly Love Dept.: I’ll give a Philly shout-out to the aforementioned ROSY HOUSE, which comes from “row house,” which is what our fair city is filled with. Also will note the upcoming start of March Madness, otherwise known as the annual office bracket-guessing contest sponsored by NCAA (“Certain tourney overseer,” 105 Down). The Philly-area Villanova Wildcats may be one of the higher seeds this year.

City of Angels Dept.: Having just returned from a weeklong visit to my other hometown (Los Angeles), I’ll point out that a “College up the coast from L.A.” is UCSB (102 Down), for the University of California at Santa Barbara. And a “CBS series that, oddly, was filmed in L.A.” was CSI: NY (53 Down).

New To Me Dept.:  Was not familiar with STEPTOE (“Isolated hill surrounded by lava,” 8 Across) or EUROMART (“Continental free trade group,” 86 Across), both of which I got from crossing words.

Product Placement Dept.: You’ll find both ISOTONER (“Brand of gloves and slippers,” 84 Down) and DENTYNE (“Orbit rival,” 67 Across) in the grid.

You’ve Got To Be Kidding Dept.: MAZY is a word? As in maze-like? Seriously? Apparently it’s a synonym for “Labyrinthine” (66 Down).

Need some solving tips and tricks? I’ve posted some here. Feel free to ask questions or leave comments below. You can also visit my Facebook page, or tweet me @crosswordkathy. And here’s a little more about me.

It Was 50 Years Ago Today

New York Times crossword puzzle Feb. 9 / Constructed by Charles M. Deber

Aaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!

That’s the only way I know how to scream in text. And no other sound better represents BEATLEMANIA (“Craze caused by this puzzle’s subjects,” 3 Down) than a good ear-splitting shriek.

Yes, today’s fun and nostalgic crossword refers to THE FAB FOUR (“Nickname for this puzzle’s subjects,” 14 Down), who made their U.S. debut a half-century ago when they appeared on “The ED SULLIVAN Show” (“Host for this puzzle’s subjects on 2/9/64,” 6 Down).

The New York Times has succumbed to Beatlemania. (Click to enlarge.)

The New York Times has succumbed to Beatlemania. (Click to enlarge.)

The fill includes lots of Beatles references, from their hometown of LIVERPOOL (81 Down) to the songs they played on Sullivan’s show: SHE LOVES YOU (17 Down) and YESTERDAY (83 Down). There are also a few snippets of lyrics in there, like “When I WAS younger, so much younger …” (from “Help!”, 74 Across) and “Why AM I so shy when …” (from “It’s Only Love”, 86 Across) – not to mention “Let IT BE” (42 Across). The clues also note the band played at SHEA stadium (107 Down) in 1965 and 1966. And of course their biggest audience was TEENAGERS (70 Across).

The grid’s centerpiece is the snake of gray squares that depicts a GUITAR (102 Down). The Beatles’ names cleverly form the outline of this long and winding road: PAUL MCCARTNEY and JOHN LENNON appear at 9 Down and RINGO STARR and GEORGE HARRISON join them on the other side, beginning at 11 Down.

Pretty creative, I thought. What did you think?

Memory Lane Dept.: It’s pretty trippy to read these re-released stories about the Beatles from the Associated Press. Written during the group’s U.S. invasion, an introduction to the articles notes: “In covering the airport arrival, AP reporter Arthur Everett goes to great lengths to use contemporary slang like ‘way out’ and ‘fab.’”

Say What? Dept.: I’ve never heard anyone use the word LOLLOP (“Move in an ungainly way,” 32 Across). Also was not familiar with the town of TROYES (“City on the Seine upstream from Paris,” 127 Across).

Cheesy Dept.: “Houston sch.” is RICE U, short for Rice University, an entry that surely got the constructor out of a jam. And WYES (which I initially entered as WHYS) is one way to phonetically spell the plural of the penultimate letter of the alphabet (“Followers of exes,” 62 Across).

Doubled-Up Dept.: “Apes” are both OAFS (79 Down) and IMITATORS (80 Down). And a “Medical suffix” is both OMA (118 Down) and OSIS (115 Down).

UPDATE: Lonely Hearts Club Dept.: Many thanks to my husband – a major fan of the Beatles, if not crosswords – who pointed out the puzzle title’s reference to the lyrics of “Sgt. Pepper …” : “It was 20 years ago today …”

Need some solving tips and tricks? I’ve posted some here. Feel free to ask questions or leave comments below. You can also visit my Facebook page, or tweet me @crosswordkathy. And here’s a little more about me.